Hurricane Irene | Live from Brooklyn

 

A photo of Hurricane Irene from NASA

 

So the hub-bub this week is Hurricane Irene.  New York was in a frenzy yesterday as Eddie and I went to three different stores trying to find batteries, candles and other emergency supplies.  Everyone was already in an “anything can happen” mood after an aftershock from the Virginia/ DC area rocked New York City for about 15 seconds.  But those 15 seconds still represented something unheard of (unimaginable?) happening.  Now, on alert, my fellow New Yorkers scattered around Manhattan, buzzing about, seeking out the things nyc.gov told them to buy.

The only thing that really bothers me about Irene – aside from the abrupt stop to our vast transportation network – is the fact that the news is putting on a very scary display of the storm.  I’m more than aware of the seriousness of catastrophic weather.  I know hurricanes are dangerous, that people have died, that they are unpredictable.  I also know that I’m in a high-rise point of Brooklyn, that I’m far away from the danger zone and that me and mine will wait out the storm and be fine…

…our mothers in California, however don’t.  Between my mother’s worried questions over the phone and Eddy’s mother’s barrage of text messages, we were compelled to talk about the difference of the “alert” New Yorkers are actually feeling to the panick the rest of the country seems to be in.  Obama calling Irene a “historical storm” didn’t help matters.  Even I found myself re-checking the news for updates at that point.

Is this the apocalypse supply line?

New York Times quotes a local New Yorker

 

The point of all of this, if your honest enough to look closer, is that everyone should be prepared.  Emergencies happen all the time and suddenly those conveniences and safety nets we’ve carefully placed in our life has been shut off.  Its important that people (all over) learn how to maintain, even when the power has been cut off.

 

 

 

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